Contractors urge Osborne to keep his focus in this week’s Budget

This week’s Budget

The pre-Budget media train has been in full motion over the weekend with genuine personal service companies (PSCs) all being wrongly tarred with the same tax avoiders brush. Trading through a personal service company is perfectly legal and above board. That is the correct starting point.


Surely if that premise was untrue all of these heinous crimes would have lead to fines or custodial sentences, or perhaps just changes to the legislation to catch the baddies. But that hasn’t happened.


FCSA is rightly pleading with Osborne to ”get his facts right before tarnishing all contractors with the same brush ahead of Wednesday’s Budget”. Contractors and freelancers are a valuable part of the UK’s workforce and those operating legitimately should not be punished as government look to clampdown on abusers.


Intouch supports tightening of the rules to make the system fair and just, but are singing from the same hymn sheet as FCSA in urging government not to attach genuinely independent workers who bring their highly valuable knowledge and experience into companies when they’re needed.


What’s likely to come up on Wednesday for contractors?

Contractors are already expected to deal with changes to the way dividends and expenses are taxed. Here’s what will be of interest on Wednesday lunchtime:


  • Dividends – the current tax credits will go and the new dividend tax kicks in on 6th April. Our Dividend ebrief tells you more about the new rules, what they mean and what you can do to make the most of your dividends.
  • Travel and subsistence expenses – any contractors who are under the supervision, direction or control (SDC) of their client will lose tax relief of their T&S expenses. This is likely to hit Umbrella workers the hardest as well as any contractors operating within IR35.
  • Stamp duty on second homes – any contractors with a second home will have to pay a 3% Stamp Duty surcharge.
  • IR35 – silence was golden in the Autumn Statement in which IR35 was put to one side. But we’re expecting it to raise it’s head again now Spring is here. The discussion document issued last year will most likely progress to consultation and we already know to expect an improved Employment Status Indicator Tool by the end of this year.
  • Income Tax threshold – it’s expected that the Personal Allowance will rise to £11,000. We also anticipate seeing the higher rate income tax threshold rise, probably to £43,000, as government continue to edge towards their longer term target of £50,000.
  • Company liquidations – changes likely to come into effect on 6th April mean any contractor looking to wind up their company but then continue contracting will have their distributions chargeable to Income Tax, rather than Capital Gains Tax. In short, this is a huge blow to the plans many contractors had to close down a company without perhaps retiring for good.


Other speculation

It’s more than likely that the Chancellor will continue with his focus on tax avoidance and clamping down on those who use marketed schemes to avoid paying their fair share.


Rumours are being leaked about Osborne reverting back to the old limit of 40p additional income tax rate band. It’s also unclear what the Chancellor will announce about pensions. While talk of major changes to the system of pension tax relief is making its way around the rumour mill, it seems more likely that there will be a reduction in benefits currently enjoyed by savers. If this proves true on Wednesday then now doesn’t seem like the right time to further reform pensions.


48 hours to go

With the Budget less than 48 hours away, the speculation will keep going round until the Red Box is opened in the House of Commons. We will be watching with interest and unpicking exactly what Osborne’s announcements mean for contractors. Make sure you’re in the know. Keep an eye out for our Budget special blog.

In the meantime, download our 2015/16 tax yearend ebrief to ensure you’re making the most of your money before 5 April.


This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.