AWR – could you lose out? Introduction to AWR

Introduction to AWR

By now you’ve probably heard the abbreviations AWD or AWR, which are often used interchangeably – AWD being the Agency Workers Directive and AWR, the Agency Workers Regulations.

But, do you know what it’s all about and, most importantly, do you know if it affects you and, if so, what actions do you need to take to reduce the risk of losing out on that key contract?

In this article, Paul Gough, Managing Director of Intouch Accounting, the personal online accounting adviser for contractors and freelancers, explains more about how the changes which came into force on 1 October 2011 may affect you, as a contractor, and he looks at whether now may be the time to move from an Umbrella to a Limited Company.

 

AWD and AWR – what is it all about?

In brief, the AWD is the original directive issued by the European Commission in 2008, with the aim of promoting a more flexible workforce.

The final UK legislation, the AWR, is based on this directive and focuses on the protection of ‘vulnerable’ temporary workers.

As of 1 October, and after a 12 week qualifying period on a contract with the same hirer, according to the AWR, a temporary worker will be entitled to the same basic employment rights as their permanent comparable counterparts, in relation to pay and other basic working conditions, such as annual leave, night work, rest periods, working hours and rest breaks.

But, if there are no comparable workers, then there is no entitlement to equal treatment and, if you earn more than a comparable employee, your pay will not decrease.

 

Who does the AWR affect?

Specifically, the draft regulations say ‘people finding temporary work through a “temporary work agency” ’ will be affected by the AWR, and the definition of an agency worker will be ‘based on that used for “workers” in the Working Time Regulations 1998’.
According to the regulations, this excludes workers who are genuinely one of the following:

  • self-employed;
  • working through their own Limited Liability Company;
  • or those employed on ‘Managed Service Contracts’.

The AWR will create a re-shift in the way temporary workers are managed; whether via an Umbrella company, a recruitment agency, or directly with the end client.

 

I am with an Umbrella – how does the AWR affect me?

If you’re currently working through an Umbrella company then you can expect your pay to be the same as if you’d been recruited directly by the hirer, or as paid to a comparable employee.

If you receive part of your pay as a reimbursement for travel costs, then this can form part of your overall pay.

Example: if an employee earns £200 a day, then you could receive £180 pay and £20 in travel.

NOTE: There is an exemption from the equal treatment provisions on pay, where the worker is offered a permanent contract of employment and they are paid between assignments. The pay must be at least 50% of the ‘on assignment’ level and be above the National Minimum Wage.

There are certain things that reset the qualifying period to zero too, such as a break of over 6 weeks (unless it’s due to sickness, maternity or jury service). But, moving from one Umbrella to another will not reset it.

This is not retrospective either, so if you’re already on assignment, the 12 week qualifying period will start from 01 October 2011.

 

I am a Limited Company – do I need to worry about the AWR?

If you are a contractor using a Limited Company, you appear to have little to be worried about – as long as you are genuinely in business on your own account (using the same employment tests as IR35). In these cases, the directive most likely does not apply to you, and you can carry on business as usual.

 

What if I am caught out by IR35?

It has been made clear in the guidance that if you fall inside of IR35, then you are also subject to the AWR. In these cases, you should discuss the situation with your agency, to ensure that you are properly prepared for the October implementation. Or speak to a contractor accountant, such as Intouch Accounting.

If you’re a Limited Company contractor, you will not be affected by the AWR. But, if you’re an Umbrella contractor, you will almost certainly be affected, with the regulations clearly stating that the definition does ‘include agency workers contracted to an Umbrella company’.

 

How could the AWR have a negative impact on me as a contractor?

While the AWR is designed to protect the vulnerable, lower paid agency workers from being exploited, it could have a negative impact on you if you are a well paid contractor and you choose temporary work as your preferred method of making a living.

  • The increase in red tape and the extra administrative costs to hirers of contractors and agencies may deter them from employing you if you are affected by the AWR.
  • Or they may choose to subsidise the extra administrative costs by reducing your contract rates.
  • And, end clients may choose not to engage with you for more than 12 weeks, in order to avoid the increase in your ‘employee’ rights – putting more pressure on you to find new work more regularly.

 

So, where do I go from here?

In the months following the introduction to AWR, it’s likely that many agencies and clients will not fully understand the legislation, and it’s possible that contractors could gain a competitive advantage if you can demonstrate that the regulations do not apply to you, as someone who is outside of IR35.

But, if you’re working through an Umbrella, and you’re confident you don’t fall foul of IR35, then maybe it’s time to consider setting up your own Limited Company? This will give the hirer peace of mind that you are not affected by the AWR and it could increase your chances of winning that contract, or retaining it for longer than 12 weeks.

It really is very easy to move from Umbrella to Limited!

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

VAT – Could you be paying too much? Flat Rate VAT?

The benefits and burdens for contractors of the flat rate VAT scheme

Paul Gough, Managing Director of Intouch Accounting, the personal online accounting adviser for contractors and freelancers, looks at the pros and cons of adopting a flat rate scheme, and explains more about how the scheme could affect contractors’ take home pay.

The flat rate scheme, or FRS, was introduced by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) in 2002, as a way to simplify accounting for small businesses. In short, in order to calculate the amount of VAT paid to HMRC, the income of a business, including any output tax, is applied to a flat rate percentage. With a few exceptions, input VAT on purchases is ignored.

And the result: a very simple VAT accounting process, making completion of the VAT return easy to do, and easy to verify.

 

Who uses the flat rate scheme and why?

The scheme is open to businesses whose annual taxable turnover or estimated turnover is less than £150,000. Once you’ve joined the scheme you can stay until your turnover exceeds £230,000 including VAT.

It was very quickly established that, for many contractors (those who fit within the threshold), accounting for VAT on the flat rate scheme actually produced a lower VAT liability than when VAT was accounted for on the normal basis. And so, an opportunity to “profit” from the simplified scheme quickly emerged and the scheme became the norm – with most contractors adopting it as their chosen method for accounting for VAT.

But, as with many aspects of accounting and tax, a standard solution is not always the right solution.

Too often advisers adopt a standardised approach to dealing with contractors and fail to consider, on an individual case basis, whether or not the standard solution is in fact appropriate. Providers of accounting software solutions may not raise this issue with you at all.

 

1. Are you exporting goods or receiving rental or investment income?

Under the FRS, with a few exceptions all of your income is included in the calculation. This means that income that may not be normally subject to VAT output is still included in the flat rate calculation.

A good example is if you work abroad for a non-business customer (such as an individual) and zero- rate your services. In this case, there is no VAT. However, under the FRS you would still calculate the percentage on that zero rated income and pay that to HMRC.

But it’s worth noting that when you provide your services to a “commercial entity” it is the place of supply that is important. The place of supply is where the customer belongs, and if that is outside of the UK then this work is outside the scope of VAT and is not included.

Similarly, other zero-rated sales and exempt sales are included. So, make sure you watch out where you export goods, or receive rental and some investment income; you could end up paying more VAT on the flat rate scheme than under the standard scheme.

And, if you sell capital assets and you previously reclaimed VAT, then you must account for the VAT on sales on the standard basis even though you use the flat rate scheme.

 

2. Do you know if the right rate of VAT is being applied to you?

The second danger is that, too often, the percentage selected as the flat rate is a default rate, without thought to the nature of the services being supplied. This is often the fault of the accounting services provider who packages a service together, without applying thought to the individual circumstances of a contractor, and the work undertaken. With the flat rate varying, sometimes the standard flat rate applied is not the right rate, leading to a higher level of VAT liability.

We have seen flat rates as low as 10.5%, when the “norm” applied to contractors is 14.5%. The difference could amount to thousands every year.

 

3. Are you sure that VAT is being recovered when it should be?

The third danger is that input VAT is not recovered when it could be. Where contractors purchase capital assets and the cost exceeds £2,000 (including VAT), the input tax can still be recovered and deducted from the flat rate calculation. Attention to the detail is important. This can often be overlooked because such purchases don’t happen very often.

And, if you buy items and sell them on – which does sometimes happen when you incur costs for your client and recharge them – the VAT on the costs you incur cannot be reclaimed.

 

4. Do you incur unusually high volumes of input VAT on purchases?

The final danger is that if you incur higher than usual volumes of input VAT, by hiring other contractors (who are VAT registered) as sub-contractors for example, then this will significantly increase your VAT suffered. Under the FRS you will be unable to reclaim this back from the VAT man, as it does not qualify for inclusion. The “lost” VAT element will increase your costs and reduce your profitability.

 

Are there any benefits to using the flat rate scheme?

While we have mentioned some of the disadvantages to using this system for VAT, the good news is that there are also significant advantages to using the flat rate scheme:

 

1. Less VAT payable in your first year

If you’re in the first year of VAT registration, you get a one per cent reduction in your flat rate percentage – and this applies until the day before your first anniversary of being VAT registered.

 

2. More time to spend on your business

Because you don’t need to record VAT suffered on every purchase (as with standard VAT accounting), you’ll incur lower administration and processing costs – giving you more time to focus on your business, rather than on the onerous VAT administration process.

 

3. Fewer risks and less chance of making a mistake

Also, with fewer rules, there’s less chance of making mistakes on your VAT return using the scheme, reducing the risk of accidentally claiming input VAT which you’re not entitled to – and, therefore, reducing the risk of an investigation by HMRC.

 

4. You could even profit from the scheme

With FRS you pay a percentage of turnover whereas, with standard VAT accounting, you pay VAT on the difference between sales and purchases. So, while you continue to charge clients the standard rate of 20% VAT, you don’t have to give that percentage to the VAT man. For IT contractors, for example, the norm is 14.5% VAT, but the FRS rate differs from sector to sector.

 

But, make sure you calculate your flat rate turnover correctly and avoid paying a penalty to HMRC

 If you accidentally leave items out and end up paying too little VAT, you could incur a penalty from HMRC.

So, make sure you work out your flat rate turnover correctly – or speak to a specialist personal online accounting adviser who will help you to avoid any tricky situations with HMRC.

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

The Budget 2011

George Osborne presented his second Budget 2011 on Wednesday 23 March 2011.

In his statement he said that the “Budget 2011 is about reforming the nation’s economy, so that we have enduring growth and jobs in the future”.

Towards the end of last year the government issued the majority of the clauses, in draft, of Finance Bill 2011 together with updates on consultations. The publication of the draft Finance Bill clauses is part of the government’s improvements in the way tax policy is developed, communicated and legislated. The Budget updates some of these previous announcements and also proposes further measures. Some of these changes apply from April 2011 and some take effect at a later date, so the timing needs to be carefully considered.

Our summary focuses on the issues likely to affect you, your family and your business. To help you decipher what was said we have included our own comments.

 

Main Budget proposals

  •     An additional 1% cut in the main rate of corporation tax to 26% from April 2011.
  •     Enhanced tax incentives for investment in higher risk companies and for SMEs investing in research and development.
  •     Reintroduction of Enterprise Zones.
  •     Entrepreneurs’ Relief limit doubled to £10 million.
  •     An increase in the mileage rate payable to own car drivers.
  •     Consultation on integrating income tax and national insurance contributions.
  •     Reduced inheritance tax rates for those giving one tenth of their estate to charity.

 

Previous announcements

Some of the changes detailed in this summary have been the subject of earlier announcements. Here is a reminder of some of the more important ones:

  •     Changes to tax and national insurance rates and thresholds
  •     Pensions – new regimes for tax reliefs and annuities
  •     Furnished holiday lettings changes
  •     The Corporate Tax Road Map.

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

‘No plan’ to bring in Cable’s mansion tax

‘No plan’ to bring in Cable’s mansion tax

Vince Cable’s plan for a mansion tax was rejected by the Treasury last night.

The Business Secretary wants a tax on expensive properties to pay for the scrapping of the 50p income tax rate but Whitehall insiders poured scorn on the idea.

A source close to Chancellor George Osborne said: ‘The Government’s tax policies were set out in full in last week’s Budget.’

A Government source said: ‘In the Budget, the Chancellor said he was specifically looking at tax avoidance and evasion on high-value properties, not a new property tax.

‘Certainly no work has been commissioned on a mansion tax.

The condemnation came after Mr Cable and Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg clashed over the Business Secretary’s proposal.

Mr Clegg said the policy was not on the cards, instead suggesting higher stamp duty for luxury home buyers or a revamping of council tax.

He added: ‘It could be a range of things; the way the council tax system is structured, the way stamp duty is structured.’

He said the Budget was ‘pretty close to what I would have delivered if I was prime minister and had a Liberal Democrat chancellor’.

In contrast, when Mr Cable was asked if he wanted to revive his controversial mansion tax policy, he said: ‘There is a strong argument that you need a proper base for taxing property. I’m sure we’re going to look at that.’

But Treasury sources said the only change made to property tax in the Budget was to close loopholes in stamp duty that help property tycoons avoid high levies.

Government sources were baffled as to how Mr Clegg could suggest changes in the way councils levy local taxes as the Coalition has ruled out property revaluations needed to do this.

A source close to Mr Clegg said: ‘Nick was setting out our principles on tax – that it is better to tax wealth, particularly unearned wealth, than work.’

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

How to pay PAYE during 2011

How to pay PAYE during 2011

HMRC are no longer sending out yellow payslip booklets to enable a company to pay its PAYE, instead they are issuing a letter reminding companies of the details needed in order to pay online.

PAYE can be paid monthly, or quarterly if your payments are under £1,500 per month on average.

A direct payment can be made to HMRC with the following details:

 

Account name:                                    HMRC Shipley

Account number:                                 12001020

Sort Code:                                            08-32-10

You will need your accounts office reference which will be similar to 049PG012345678.

If you are unsure of your reference, please contact us.

Each payment made will also need to include a reference that is specific to the month it relates to.

So for the quarter to 5th July 2011 you would use 049PG0123456781203.

The cleared funds must reach HMRC’s bank account by the 22nd of the month or quarter it relates to.  HMRC can charge interest and penalties if payments are late.

If no PAYE is due you must still inform HMRC, and you can do this online here:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/payinghmrc/paye-nil.htm

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

Freelancer wins long battle over IR35

Freelancer wins long battle over IR35

Mark Fitzpatrick (taxpayer) and sole owner of MBF Design Services Ltd was cleared by a tax tribunal of charges brought by HMRC under the IR35 legislation, which claimed that he was using his Limited Company to avoid tax when working as a contractor to Airbus. The IR35 challenge brought by HMRC appears to have lost of several counts but most clearly on a lack of “mutuality of obligation” (“MOO”). It seems that if contractors arrange their affairs correctly and the arrangement terms reflect the reality of the situation then IR35 will not apply.

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

Mirrlees Review

Mirrlees Review

The Mirrlees Review brought together a high-profile group of international experts and younger researchers to identify the characteristics of a good tax system for any open developed economy in the 21st century, to assess the extent to which the UK tax system conforms to these ideals, and to recommend how it might realistically be reformed in that direction.

The Review is being published by Oxford University Press in two volumes. The first, Dimensions of Tax Design, consists of a set of specially commissioned chapters dealing with different aspects of the tax system, accompanied by a series of commentaries by different expert authors, voicing differing opinions on the issue discussed. The second volume, Tax by Design, sets out the conclusions of the Review.

Both volumes are being posted to download free of charge on this site when they are published. On 10 November 2010 we launched the findings of the Review and issued a press release.

 

Dimensions of Tax Design | Now available online

The first volume consists of a set of thirteen specially commissioned studies which draw on the latest thinking in each area. The authors of each chapter assess a different dimension of tax design. These are supplemented by expert commentaries to provide a comprehensive range of views and ideas.

 

Tax by Design | Drafts now available online

The second volume, written by the Review’s editorial team, presents a picture of coherent tax reform. Its aim is to identify the characteristics of a good tax system for any open developed economy, to assess the extent to which the UK tax system conforms to these ideals, and to recommend how it might realistically be reformed in that direction. Drawing on the expert evidence from the commissioned chapters and commentaries, it provides an integrated view of tax reform.

 

Mirrlees Review launch of findings | Presentations now available online

We launched the findings of the Mirrlees Review on 10 November 2010. At the launch Sir James Mirrlees set out the main conclusions of the Review. Other members of the editorial team described the policy implications in more depth and went on to discuss four key themes: earnings taxation, indirect taxation, taxation of savings and corporate taxation.

A pamphlet with the main conclusions was published and distributed at the launch and all Tax by Design chapters are now available as pre-publication drafts on the Review website. Oxford University Press will publish Tax by Design early in 2011.

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

Twitter joke trial accountant loses appeal

Accountant loses appeal

Paul Chambers, the accountant finance manager who lost his job for posting a tweet threatening to blow Doncaster’s Robin Hood Airport “sky high”, has failed to get his conviction overturned.

According to a tweet posted from court by his lawyer @davidallengreen just after 4pm on Thursday 11 November which confirmed the verdict as “guilty”.

Following his conviction in May for causing a “menace” under the Communications Act 2003, Chambers was fined £1,000 (£385 plus costs) and lost his job as a finance supervisor. His original fine stands, but following his failed appeal the costs are now in excess of £2,500.

In September, judges at Doncaster crown court heard arguments from lawyers acting for Chambers that his conviction should be overturned because the prosecution had not proved Chambers had intended to cause menace. The Twitter post was “hyperbolic banter”, they argued.

But after considering the arguments for six weeks, the three judges turned down the appeal on all counts and ruled the message was “obviously menacing”.

According to The Guardian’s report from the appeal, Judge Jacqueline Davies commented, “The words in the message speak for themselves and they were sent at a time when the security threat to this country was substantial.”

The verdict sent shockwaves around the Twitterverse, with campaigners tweeting a multitude of threatening messages and pledging support and funds. One of our followers, @quinex1, a finance director based in the East Midlands, tweeted: “Please would @AccountingWEBuk followers give @pauljchambers a chance to reclaim his career? It would make everyone happy.”

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

Ministers group set up to help freelancers

Ministers group set up to help freelancers

A Ministers Group representing the freelance profession has been introduced.

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on the Freelance Sector has been established and will be chaired by Brian Binley, MP for Northampton South. Administrative assistance will be provided by PCG.

Read more here. 

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The group intends to act as a bridge between the freelance community and parliament.

Binley said: “Freelancers play a vital role within our economy and often their efforts go largely unnoticed. I am hopeful that this group can bring together freelancers across all different industries with the common aim of improving the conditions they are faced with.”

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

OTS is reviewing over 1,000 tax reliefs

OTS is reviewing over 1,000 tax reliefs

FOR THE FIRST time in 200 years someone has managed to map out the UK’s tax relief system – a system which has ballooned according to the government of the day, taxpayer demand, and backlashes to aggressive tax schemes.

The Office of Tax Simplification (OTS) is trawling through 1,042 reliefs, allowances and exemptions – which cover everything from selling assets stolen by the Nazis, to deep-sea drills- before recommending which should be simplified or scrapped.

The difficulty facing the OTS is that each relief – even the ones which seem obscure – may be vital to a particular group of people or businesses.

For this reason, the UK’s dense mesh of double taxation reliefs – an area the OTS is known to be looking at – will raise major points of conflict if they are “simplified”, because simplification often translates as a relief being withdrawn.

It’s inevitable the OTS will encounter a wall of resistance with any potential changes in this area because of the sheer number of groups that come under the double taxation umbrella. It’s not just the high-net worth individuals and corporates considering whether to leave the UK for countries with lower tax rates.

Double tax reliefs also affect the UK’s two million migrant workers, overseas bank workers – most of whom aren’t super-rich traders – 22,000 diplomatic staff, and non-domiciled individuals who all rely on these breaks.

Lowly-paid migrant workers currently don’t have to file tax returns when paying tax on any overseas income they make below a value of £10,000.

Even a slight change to the rules – for example, a decrease of the £10,000 ceiling – could see more of these lowly paid workers shelling out for tax returns to be prepared and also cause a rise in admin costs for the taxman.

Against this backdrop, the Low Incomes Tax reform Group (LITRG) will be lobbying for the relief to be kept. “We are keen that this [relief] is preserved – not least as it was LITRG who persuaded ministers to introduce it,” an LITRG spokesman said.

If the relief were removed we think the amount saved would very quickly be swallowed up by the administration costs of dealing with the tax returns of low-income migrants,” LITRG added.

Another good example of the difficulty facing the OTS are the tax rules for freelancers. These are relatively new, but have suffered from criticisms that they are fiendishly complex.

There is already a project running to simplify the freelancer income tax rules known as IR35, but there are related areas which could also come under the OTS spotlight.

The numerous reliefs available to businesses for training expenditure could easily be changed or withdrawn, but this would have a marked effect on the freelancer sector.

Contractors trading as managed service companies keep their skills up-to-date in order to stay in business, and often have to fork out for expensive training courses.

With 20,000 members potentially affected, the Professional Contractors Group (PCG) says it would strongly resist any withdrawal of income tax relief on relevant training courses.

PCG representatives are currently preparing to lobby the OTS for guarantees that training courses will be spared the axe.

But the OTS will not just face resistance from taxpayers. The panel could also face opposition from both the Treasury and HM Revenue & Customs: the OTS has been told to make sure recommendations end up revenue neutral, a senior OTS figure tells Accountancy Age.

Trying to make sure that the UK’s coffers neither benefit or lose out by the proposed changes to potentially hundreds of reliefs is almost impossible, advisers say.

The OTS already has enough to worry about without government divisions potentially taking umbrage with its recommendations.

One particular bugbear for the taxman is the way UK- based multinationals pass company funds through subsidiaries in low tax jurisdictions.

Controlled foreign companies (CFC) rules cause advisers and businesses a major headache in terms of complexity, and efforts have been dragging on for years to simplify the system.

These efforts have pushed on in recent months but that would not stop the OTS weighing into the CFC issue because of the panel’s wide-reaching mandate to make recommendations on all areas of the tax system.

John Whiting, the tax specialist in charge at the panel, has said there will be no issue the body will shy away from in trying to make the system less administratively complex.

“It isn’t about saving money, this is about a more efficient tax system,” Whiting said.

“If you come up with some sensible recommendations, it will make it very hard for the government to argue against them.”

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.