Working From Home – where do you start?

Why work from home?

Contracting and freelancing are fast becoming the choice career moves for more employees each year in the UK and it’s evident why. Being your own boss allows more flexibility and the chance for a better work/life balance. Choosing the jobs you want, and when and where you do them is also a great perk. Some might say that they choose to work from home because a relaxed atmosphere increases productivity and efficiency, while others just like to avoid office politics. There are a whole host of benefits to home working, particularly from a health and well-being point of view.

 

Making it work for you

Most contractors prefer a combination of remote and on-site working, to ensure some kind of visible presence, or because they enjoy the variety it brings. But for those wanting to ditch the office environment entirely, these are some things to consider:

 

Advantages

•Arranging your routine to suit you

•Freedom to spend time with friends and family

•Setting up your work space however you like

•No commuting saves time and money

•Less stressful environment

 

Disadvantages

•Distractions such as housework and people who share the same building

•Finding it harder to switch off

•Feeling isolated. If this is a concern, take a look at our infographic for tips on how to make those all-important connections.

 

Setting up a workspace

The beauty of home working is that you can set up your space to suit your needs. You can use a spare room, convenient corner or even under the stairs – technology means workspaces can be much smaller these days, so don’t build that garden office just yet!

Make sure the space is as comfortable and efficient as possible. Get suitable furniture such as a desk at the correct height and a chair, which is good for your posture. Try not to buy expensive equipment to start with – basics would be a computer, printer and scanner – you’ll soon find out what’s essential. It’s also useful to have a smartphone specifically for business, which you can set to voicemail after hours.

And think carefully about colour and decor, which affect your mood more than you might think.

 

Be professional about it

Communication is one of the most important aspects for making homeworking a success, so reliable broadband is a must, as is making yourself contactable and available to speak during working hours. Respond to clients promptly so they know you’re on the job – they’ll want to make sure they’re getting their money’s worth after all. And don’t be tempted to slob around in your dressing gown all day either! Clients will expect exactly the same standards as someone who is office based, and ‘getting ready’ for work will put you in the right frame of mind too.

 

Costs and claims

Due to virtually no set-up costs, working from home is one of the cheapest ways to start a business. If you’re intending to claim expenses through your Limited Company, your home office should be adequately arranged to indicate that it’s a genuine business and not part of your normal domestic arrangements i.e. working from a dining table the family eat at every evening.

It’s also not sufficient to spend a few minutes a week on admin, you actually need to be working at your home office and generating income to justify a claim.

We’ll discuss more about this particular topic in our next blog, but in the meantime a good Specialist Contractor Accountant like Intouch will be able to advise on home office deductions.

 

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

The flexible working ‘movement’: where are we with it?

Today’s complex working landscape presents businesses with the challenge of meeting the demands of people with very different values, expectations and needs. Yet, they all seem to share a desire for flexible working.

It’s little wonder, then, that the flexible working movement has gained such momentum in the last decade. Employers have recognised that the traditional workplace is no longer fit for purpose. But we’re yet to reach a point where flexible working is ‘the norm’, even four years on from the introduction of laws by the UK government which gave everyone the legal right to request flexible working.

 

To use the ‘right to request’ or not

People are still unsure whether or not to use their right to request flexible working, for fear it could be perceived as a sign that they are less than dedicated to their job. In a study conducted by social media training experts Digital Mums last year, more than half (51%) of UK employees believed that asking for flexible working hours would be viewed negatively by their employer and a further 42% thought it would have a negative impact on their career.

Millennials, who are one of the key drivers of the movement, were particularly wary of not wanting to upset their employer, with two-fifths (40%) saying they’d be too nervous or worried to ask for flexible working hours, despite eight in ten (77%) wanting this way of working.

Those fears might very well be legitimate. According to a new joint report from flexible working experts Timewise and consultants Deloitte, more than 30% of workers who opt for flexible hours feel they have less status and importance as a result. A quarter of the 2,000 people surveyed also thought they had missed professional opportunities because of this.

For freelancers and contractors, there aren’t the same lingering fears, although they might have some concerns about whether working remotely could impact on the relationship with the client, if there is an expectation to be on site every day.

 

Remove the need to request

As we revealed in our previous blog on the pros and cons of flexible working, however, any concerns employers might have about what flexible working could do for business are often shown to be ill-founded.

Ask anybody who works flexibly whether they work harder and more productively now than they did when they were in a more structured setting and the answer would be unequivocally ‘yes’. Flexible workers often say they feel like they owe it to their company to go beyond the call of duty every day. While that brings up another issue entirely around work/life balance – another main driver of the movement – it goes to show how much staff value flexible working.

In a recent piece of research by SmallBusinessPrices.co.uk, more than a quarter (28%) of respondents said they value additional holiday days, sabbaticals and flexible working hours as employee benefits, over receiving a pay rise.

By promoting flexible working – rather than making employees request it – employers could find themselves with a line of new talent at the door, while holding onto the existing talent they already have in the building.

It could even help end gender discrimination in the workplace. According to the Timewise/Deloitte report, one of the biggest barriers to gender equality and pay parity is employers’ continued refusal to accept non-traditional working practices.

Timewise chief executive Karen Mattison stresses that the family structure in which one person stayed at home and another went out to work is “no longer the case for the majority of UK households” and employers need to react by changing their flexible working practices.

With the technology available today to facilitate flexible working, it’s never been a better time for individuals to dictate how long, where and when they work. More and more people are taking the plunge and ‘going it alone’ as either a contractor or a freelancer.

Of course, with Intouch Accounting by your side, you’re never alone. We are here to support you by answering any questions you may have, from assessing whether it’s the right time for you to contract or freelance, to helping you set up a Limited Company.

 

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

IR35 in the private sector – HMRC announces consultation

In last Autumn’s Budget, the government announced that it would consult on how to tackle non-compliance with IR35 rules in the private sector. On Friday, HMRC issued this eagerly-awaited consultation which they say “looks at improving the rules around ‘off-payroll’ working so contractors who work through their own company pay the right tax.”

At Intouch, we would suggest that HMRC learn from the negative feedback following the public sector reform and at the same time, remember that private sector and public sector hirers are different entities with different motivations and potential responses. They engage with their clients in different ways and often at different levels and as such we’d encourage HMRC not to view them as the same with respect to off-payroll rules and deemed employment. Input should be taken from across the industry with a view to tailoring a bespoke private sector solution that improves compliance whilst mitigating any potential administrative burdens.

The consultation timescales mean that any changes could be introduced as early as April 2019, although we’d urge HMRC to take the time to consider timings very carefully to avoid any negative impact to the UK economy as we move forward with Brexit.

Intouch will be responding to the consultation and we encourage all other interested parties to contribute; that means contractors as well as end-hirers who want to continue to have access to and support self-employed contractors. You can see the consultation and how to send your response here – you have until 10th August!

If you want to have your say but need to brush-up on your IR35 knowledge, check out our resources below:

Guide – Embracing IR35
Infographic – IR35; Don’t panic!
IR35 FAQs

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

 

How to get your Limited Company name just right

So you’ve decided to form your own Limited Company, congratulations! While it’s a fantastically exciting time for new employment adventures, there are a few things you’ll need to get in order before you can trade through your company, and one of them is your company name. How do you go about doing it, what’s required, and how do you check if it’s even available?

This blog looks at all the factors to consider when choosing the name to ensure that it complies with the rules set by Companies House.

 

Limited or Ltd – which one to choose?

The first thing to note is that all private Limited Companies in the UK must have either ‘Limited’ or ‘Ltd’ at the end of their name.

Beware: If you register with ‘Limited’ you can use ‘Ltd’, but if you register with ‘Ltd’ you can’t use ‘Limited’. Make sure you choose the right option.

 

What’s the right name for you and your company?

The perfect company name lets prospective clients know what you do and that you mean business. Here are a few things to consider:

  • What industry are you in, and can your company name reflect this? If you’re an IT contractor for example, portray what you do straight away to your prospective clients
  • How creative do you want to be? Would you prefer to appear serious, or stand out from the crowd with your uniqueness? Made-up words or acronyms can give an individual feel
  • Will your personal name feature in the company name? As in ‘Joe Bloggs IT Contracting Limited’ for instance
  • How will your company name sit alongside your personal marketing strategy (if you have one)?
  • Will your name reflect you as an individual, or your company?

 

Deciding what your personal and/or company image is will probably be the most difficult part of creating a name. Write a list and get an idea for what feels right to you.

Another tip would be to look at your direct competitors’ names – what do you like/dislike about them, and how will you stand out against them to your prospective client base?

 

What’s generally allowed?

As long as the name is unique there’s a wide range of choice available. Some people choose random words or phrases as they’re not intending to use the company name as a brand to trade on. If this is the case for you then you’ll probably be less concerned about what the name sounds like, which gives you even greater choice.

If you intend to incorporate the company name in your marketing strategy then just bear in mind that more often than not the most obvious choices have already been taken, so you may have to get a bit creative with it. Even if you can’t find something that you really like it’s still possible to use a ‘Trading Name’ that fits, as long as this doesn’t infringe on anyone else’s name or trademark. To do this you’ll still need to display your registered company name on all documentation and your website, but you can add something like ‘Stellar Computing Genius is a trading name of Xylo 2013 Ltd’.

If you’re professionally qualified, such as a Chartered Accountant, then you may be able to obtain permission to use this in your company name if you want to, but remember to check that the full company name remains entirely unique.

Here are a few rules and considerations every contractor must abide by:

  • The name can’t be the same (or too similar) to an existing name from the Companies House index of names. With expressed permission from the other name owner you can get around this, but this is based on exceptional circumstances only. To check if it’s already been taken, visit the Companies House website
  • Your company name can’t include a ‘sensitive’ word or expression. It also can’t imply business superiority, a particular status or specific function. For example, you can’t use the word ‘bank’, as this would need to be approved by the Financial Conduct Authority
  • National words such as ‘British’, ‘Great British’, ‘Great Britain’, ‘United Kingdom’ or ‘International’ are strictly controlled. Only Companies House will allow these based on exceptional circumstances
  • The name can’t have nor indicate any connections with the Government or local authorities
  • Be creative – but not rude! Offensive names are not permitted
  • Characters, symbols and punctuation can also be restricted

 

Beware: You may wish to call your company whatever you like, but Companies House has the power to reject any name they feel doesn’t comply with the points above. So save yourself time, effort (and potentially money) and make sure you comply to get it right first time.

 

Can you reserve a company name?

While you might know what name you’d like to use, you may not be quite ready to register your Limited Company. So what do you do? Unfortunately you can’t reserve your company name, but you can set up your Limited Company in a ‘dormant’ state.

Beware: Even though the company is dormant, your legal responsibilities as a Director are still active. Make sure you’re aware of what’s required of you while your company is dormant.

 

Can you change it further down the line?

If you want or need to change your company name you can do so in two ways:

  • Special resolution – if you change the name using a special resolution, you must file a copy of the resolution, a completed NM01 form and the appropriate fee with Companies House
  • Provision in the company’s articles – if you change the company name by means provided for in the company’s articles, you must file a NM04 form and the appropriate fee with Companies House.

 

Beware: Changing your company name through Companies House isn’t the only place you’ll have to do so. If you have social media platforms, stationery, or other mediums which carry your old name, these will all have to be changed, which can get costly. Our advice is make sure you like your name before you register it!

 

As part of Intouch’s monthly fixed fee, company incorporation is included. Our specialist team will make sure you’re eased into Limited Company ownership knowing that the name, information requirements and paperwork are fully compliant and have been appropriately filed with Companies House. Good luck!

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

 

How to set up a new company

While setting up a Limited Company tends to involve more costs and admin than operating as a Sole Trader or under an Umbrella agreement, it also offers a wealth of benefits. Among them are greater tax efficiency, less personal liability and more control over your contracting business and personal finances.

If you’re certain that your skills are in demand and are confident that you can charge your desired day rate for your services, here’s what you need to do to set up your new business:

 

Choose a company name

Here’s the fun part – what do you want to call your company? This is completely down to personal preference; would you rather an abstract name, or an informative one that lets prospects know exactly what you do? Our top tips would be to research online for inspiration, brainstorm ideas and test a few of your favourites on friends and family. Before you get your heart set on anything, check with Companies House that your preferred name is available.

 

Incorporate your company

If you’re going it alone, you’ll be responsible for ‘incorporating’ your company, which essentially means registering with Companies House. Along with your company’s name and address, you’ll need:

  • Details of the appointed directors, who’ll control the business (this is likely to be you but may also include a partner/spouse).
  • Details of the company’s shares – for instance, you may have decided on shared ownership with a partner/spouse. If so, they’ll need to agree to forming the company and the written rules, called the ‘memorandum and articles of association.’
  • To check what your SIC code is, which identifies the nature of your business.
  • To establish a company bank account, register for VAT and set up a payroll scheme.

 

Pulling together all the required information can be slightly daunting; also, how you set up your company can affect how tax efficient you are further down the line. This is why you should consider seeking advice from a professional at Intouch, who will also help to ensure that you’re clued up about IR35 tax legislation. Do this and you’ll also have much more time available to channel into the next, important task…

 

Getting your name out there

With your company created, it’s time to shout about it from the rooftops and get your name out there. Take time to research different marketing and promotional tactics; how are you going to show prospects what you have to offer and encourage them to choose YOU to satisfy their next contract?

 

At Intouch Accounting our Personal Accountants get your new company all set up for free, and work with you to help you make the right business decisions and work in the most tax efficient way. We know that taking the first steps into contracting is a big decision, so we’re happy to chat through your questions even if you’re not ready to get going just yet. Get in touch with one of our expert team members today to find out more.

 

Related reads:

Venturing into contracting? Download our free guide now

Calculate your take-home pay and find out if Limited is right for you

Contractor Accountants – do you get what you pay for?

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

 

The pros and cons of a Limited Company for a contractor

After much deliberation, you’ve decided to go it alone and set up as a contractor. You’ve polished your CV and LinkedIn profile and have started looking for your first contract, but you’re yet to decide on one important factor: your new company’s trading structure.

As a contractor, you can either choose to set up as a Limited Company, a Sole Trader or work under a so-called ‘Umbrella’ agreement. This article examines the main pros and cons of operating as a Limited Company.

Pros: 

Tax-efficient

Registering as a Limited Company tends to be the most tax-efficient way of operating, particularly if your annual income is likely to exceed £40,000. As a director and shareholder in the business, you can opt to take your income in the form of dividends, which will reduce National Insurance costs.

Claimable expenses

Further savings can be made through claiming back certain business expenses, such as home office costs, childcare and mileage.

More control

As the director, you make the decisions and have full control over how your business is run, as well as your personal income and therefore rates of tax. This means no compromising with partners, or relying on third parties to collect payment for your services.

Limited personal liability

With a Limited Company, your personal finances are separate from business assets. So, if something were to go wrong, you’d only lose money from the company.

More professional image

Trading as a Limited Company gives off a more professional image, which can help you to attract and retain clients, particularly larger ones.

 

Cons:

More administration

As director, you have to ensure that your business is compliant with company law and are required to do everything from filing accounts to preparing tax returns and general bookkeeping. It’s down to you to familiarise yourself with the punitive IR35 legislation, too.

Greater responsibility

Acting as director does carry considerable responsibility. Not only will you have to conduct admin tasks on a regular basis, but it’s your duty to ensure that all information is accurate and submitted on time.

Associated costs

There are several costs related to setting up and running a Limited Company, namely those related to administration, filing and accountancy.

 

At Intouch Accounting, our Personal Accountants offer expert advice on the most suitable trading structure for your future business. We’ll manage the company formation on your behalf and relieve you of those time-consuming and often complex administrative duties. As experts in IR35, we’ll tell you everything you need to know about the legislation. Get in touch today to find out more.

 

You may also be interested in:

Venturing into contracting? Download our free guide now

Calculate your take-home pay and find out if Limited is right for you

Contractor Accountants – do you get what you pay for?

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

 

 

Start contracting with confidence in 2018

Starting a long-term career as a contractor or freelancer in 2018 has become more attractive than during any time in the last two years. If you’re looking for independence and have a skill set that matches increasing current demand, then it’s possible to both ‘have your cake and eat it’, in 2018!

 

Clarity of employment status

The turmoil that was predicted from the middle of 2017 regarding changes to IR35 (the legislation that determines your employment status and therefore your potential tax efficiency as a contractor) has not materialised. The possibility of further IR35 change in the private sector has been deferred until the public sector changes can be reviewed and lessons learned.

Meanwhile, day rates are also stabilising as employers who sought to pass the burden of employer’s National Insurance contributions entirely onto workers are experiencing resistance.

HMRC’s employment status tool (CEST: ‘Check Employment Status for Tax’) also helps; it’s not perfect, and it’s still advisable to take professional IR35 advice, but when answered openly the questions provide a pretty accurate answer.

This increased level of clarity puts the contractor in the perfect position to grasp the opportunity, and begin to enjoy the freedoms of freelancing – all good reasons to rejoice in 2018!

 

Demand for skills 

Brexit and other Government promises to deliver on infrastructure projects and technology change, are creating huge demand for IT and related skills across the UK.

Employers are still preferring to keep employment costs under their control by engaging flexible workers, under flexible or zero-hour contracts. And anti-avoidance rules are also settling down with engagers being more pragmatic and accommodating (rather than issuing blanket edicts) in order to attract and retain talent.

All good news for the 2018 contractor.

 

Taking the leap into Limited

Are you ready to have your cake and eat it? Embrace the quality of life, freedom and flexibility of being your own boss, as well as increased take home pay?

If so, there are always choices of which trading model you should trade under. As a rule of thumb (only – there are always exceptions), you should consider the following:

Semi or low-skilled workers – If you are semi or low-skilled or provided services at or near the National Minimum Wage, then using a Limited Company is not likely to be the most suitable vehicle for a number of reasons. If you’re in this category and being put under pressure to go limited, you should take independent advice.

If you’re able to choose your preferred solution, then an Umbrella organisation should give you good advice. Beware the shady Umbrellas (pun intended) though – FCSA accreditation is a must. For others with perhaps fewer expenses that can be claimed, the best solution may well be to use a simple payroll bureau, where the fees you pay are lower and the rights you get more comprehensive.

 

Skilled or ‘Knowledge Workers’ – If you’re a ‘Knowledge Worker’ or skilled in a particular trade or profession, then a Limited Company can provide you with the best solution from several perspectives. For individuals who are independent and outside of the supervision, direction or control of the hirer, there will be advantages in your take home pay. You’ll have increased flexibility and commercial credibility, but you’ll have to protect yourself for illness or inability to work (usually through insurances). Ask for assistance from a contractor accounting professional from the beginning and get off to a good start.

 

Contracting advice from experts

If you’re thinking of setting up as a Limited Company contractor, Intouch can offer more than just an accounting service. From set-up and insurance to tax and IR35 advice, your Personal Accountant will be there to help you start your journey with confidence. We know that taking your first step into contracting is a big decision so we’re happy to chat through any questions you have even if you’re not ready to get going just yet.

 

You may also be interested in:

Venturing into contracting? Download our free guide

IR35 FAQs

Intouch current joining offers

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.

 

When passion turns to profit – 5 reasons to become a Limited Company contractor

When passion turns to profit

Becoming a Limited Company contractor may seem like a big step but, when taken properly, it’s a savvy move that could see a quantum leap in your business (and your bottom line).

 

When you’re pursuing your passion as a contractor, operating under an Umbrella company looks like an attractive option – with its minimal paperwork and administration. Happy days.

 

But if you want to turn your passion into more pounds in your pocket, you may want to consider contracting through your own Limited Company. You’ll not only reduce your tax burden, but your business will become more of a magnet for prospective clients.

 

What are the advantages of contracting via a Limited Company?

There are scores of reasons for “going Limited” and trading through your own Limited Company, especially if you earn £30,000 a year or more and plan on contracting for at least three to six months. We walk you through five of the main incentives.

 

1. Tax and National Insurance Contributions (NICs)

You’ll be hard pushed to find someone – anyone – who doesn’t want to pay less tax.

As a Limited Company director, the bulk of your income is made up of dividends, which are subject to a different tax than a regular salary. Plus, National Insurance Contributions (NICs) aren’t payable on dividends. All of this means more money in your pocket at the end of the month.

Last year’s Summer Budget may have increased dividend taxation after the first £5,000 but this shouldn’t deter would-be contractors opting for the Limited Company option. After all, at the top end, you can still take home significantly more of your contract value compared to when you operate through an Umbrella company.

Why not use our take home pay calculator to see how much you can expect to take through your Limited Company versus an Umbrella?

 

2. Expenses

The more allowable business expenses you claim, the less you’ll owe the taxman.

Given that business expenses are deducted from Limited Company profits (and you only incur tax on profits), if your profits are reduced, your tax bill will be too.

As a Limited Company contractor, the range of expenses you can claim tax relief on is far broader than when you work under an Umbrella company.

 

3. VAT Flat Rate scheme

If your Limited Company taxable turnover is £150,000 or less (excluding VAT), you’re eligible to join the Flat Rate Scheme (FRS), which means you:

  • pay a fixed rate of VAT
  • keep the difference between the amount you charge your clients and pay to HMRC

 

Money-saving benefits aside, the FRS simplifies your record keeping and VAT calculations (never a bad thing). By contrast, if you choose to go down the Umbrella route, you won’t be able to take advantage of the FRS at all.

 

4. Liability

As a director of a Limited Company, you’re protected by having limited liability.

So, even if the worst happens and your business goes down the pan, you’ll only be personally responsible for your company’s debts to the extent of any shares you paid for and unsecured loans made to the company.

This is because your Limited Company has a separate legal personality. In other words, your clients enter into contracts with your Limited Company as an entity, not you as its director.

 

5. Client confidence

Appearances count for a lot in business and having a Limited Company structure can instil confidence in clients and potential clients, some of whom equate ‘Ltd’ with professionalism.

Many businesses won’t even take you on for a contract if you don’t have a registered Limited Company.

 

When is the best time to become a Limited Company contractor?

Conventional wisdom says that, while your earnings are fairly modest, it’s best to stay on the Umbrella pathway because your tax and accounting responsibilities are fairly basic. You can comfortably do a DIY job on your Self Assessment (and save yourself accountancy fees).

In reality, working as a Limited Company contractor isn’t just about saving money. It’s about keeping the financial health of your business and personal lives separate. There’s no better time to do this than now.

 

How do you start working as a Limited Company contractor?

Before cracking on as a Limited Company contractor, you’ll need to register your company with Companies House.

You have three choices:

1. Do it yourself online

2. Ask an accountant to do it on your behalf

3. Use a company formation agent

 

The Companies House website sets out the registration requirements, registration fee, restrictions on company names and so on. Or speak to us and we’ll do it for FREE in 24 hours. You can also read our guide to contracting and our blog on how to set up a Limited Company.

 

If you’re currently working under an Umbrella company and considering making the move to becoming a Limited Company contractor, talk to our experts today about what you need to know and how to get started.

 

This blog has been prepared by Intouch Accounting. While we have made every attempt to ensure that the information contained in this blog has been obtained from reliable sources, Intouch is not responsible for any errors or omissions, or for the results obtained from the use of this information. This blog should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional accounting advisers. If you have any specific queries, please contact Intouch Accounting.